MicroShift
Select Page

How do you know when a decision is right or good?   

When it comes to decision making we want to be sure we are making the best choice for our life, family, or career.  You make decisions every day, most of them are innocuous.  But the decisions you know have meaning and will have an impact can weigh you down, causing decision fatigue.   

 We are told to Eat That Frog, a reference to Brian Tracy’s book about doing the most challenging tasks first, thus freeing you up throughout the day to get more done.  When we have a challenging decision to make and put it off, our brain is taxed and energy is used creating tiredness as the day goes on.   

Intuition has to do with implicit learning.  Implicit learning is the ability of our brain to take information and store it for later use without always being aware that it is happening.

Eat That Frog is a good idea when you have a looming decision and you set a deadline for yourself (trust me, I Eat That Frog anytime I have the chance).  What about questions and choices you have to make on the fly?  When it comes to choices and decisions throughout the day we have to rely on intuition. 

Intuition is not merely a hunch in the dismissive sense.  Rather intuition has to do with implicit learning.  Implicit learning is the ability of our brain to take information and store it for later use without always being aware that it is happening.  Implicit learning happens as we view the world, relationships, read data and books.   

Every moment of every day we view how life is being acted out in front of us.  As we take in the information each day provides, it is important to reflect and consider what we experience.  This time each day to think can happen during a walk, a hike, journaling, debate with someone you trust and any other number of ways that allows us the space to consider life.   

There is so much information and data available to leaders that in order to make the best decisions we need to rely on intuition, the ‘gut feeling’ we have.  That can be a tall order if we are not taking the time to sort through the experiences of life.   

If you want to be a better decision-maker, I offer these steps: 

  • Observe the World around you.  Put down the digital device and look, listen, smell, touch and smell the world around you.  Be present. 
  • Take the time for reflection.  If you are going to build from your implicit learning, your brain needs time to filter and sift the data taken in. 

When a decision needs to be made:  

  • Consider the hard data in front of you. 
  • Be realistic about your talents, gifts, and abilities. 
  • Trust your intuition.  If it’s a wrong choice, you have another piece of data for future choices.  

How do you know when a decision is right or good?  Intuition built over time through implicit learning.  You know the best way forward, it’s in your gut.  Make the choice, live with the outcome and learn from it.